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Steaks.jpg

our produce


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our produce


The beef, lamb and eggs we produce are completely free of hormones and antibiotics. The animals have been fed nothing else but the grass that's in front of them nor have they ever been confined to a small area for feeding purposes. Very natural and healthy food with a great flavour.

Healthy attributes of grass-fed meat:

One of the many reasons grass-fed meat surpasses grain-fed is that it contains considerably more antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals. Carotenoids, such as beta-carotene, are precursors to vitamin A that are found as pigments in plants. Grain-fed beef does not contain appreciable levels of carotenoids, for the simple reason that grains don’t contain them. However, cows that eat carotenoid-rich grass and forage incorporate significant amounts of these compounds into their tissues. These carotenoids make the fat from grass-fed beef yellower than the fat from grain-fed beef, so fat color can be a good indicator of how nutrient-rich your meat is. (1)

Grass-fed beef also contains significantly more of the antioxidants vitamin E, glutathione, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase than grain-fed beef. (2) These antioxidants play an important role in protecting our cells from oxidation, especially delicate fats in the cell membrane such as omega-3 and omega-6. (3)

Antioxidants such as vitamin E and beta-carotene also work together synergistically to protect the meat itself from damage during the journey from butcher to plate. (4) These antioxidants are especially important if you choose to fry or grill your meat, because those high-heat cooking methods can be more damaging to meat than wet or low-heat methods such as stewing or braising.

Grass-fed beef also contains higher levels of beneficial nutrients like zinc, iron, phosphorus, sodium, and potassium. (5) It’s safe to say that grass-fed meat gives you more nutrition on all fronts, with its significantly higher levels of omega-3s, antioxidants, minerals, and other important nutrients. (with thanks to Chris Kresser)